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markets incidentally, too. bond markets, the fixed income markets, here we're seeing buying in germany at the moment and 10-year german bund around 3%. a little bit of buying into the gild as well as some of the safe haven trades back on. we have this italian bond auction. the first one is going to be settled in 2013 and the last one in this year, as well. it's thought that it is going to see solid demand given that it hasn't gotten any trouble getting off the ground as of late with those bond auctions, as well. a quick wrap on the forex market. here you're looking at selling in the euro/dollar right now. 1.3190. we're flirting with the high level of this trading range that we've been stuck in. dollar/yen, it's thought when this new japanese government coming into place, they're simulating the economy and to make sure a weaker yen is in place, as well. kelly. >> louisa, thanks. we're keeping an eye on gold today. could the precious metal be losing its luster come 2013? we'll find out why kuts has decided to cut exposure to the precious metal for the first time. >>> hello, everybody. we
, as opposed to adam lan za and what triggers this. think of germany, germany in the last three year has had three mass shootings, and they've had the strictest gun control laws in the world. including psychological profiling. and 2011, czech republic, nearby germany, has very lax gun control, they have not had this type shooting. >> so there's nothing we can do? we need to be complacent in the fact that we can send our children to school to be assassinated? >> no, i think that one of the problems we have on the gun control debate is it immediately starts dividing people into, you disagree with me, therefore, you're the enemy. i've opened up saying let's put gun issues on the table. let's include mental health. video games, home back ground in there. and i think where there is common ground, you could say the storage of weapons. but when we immediately start saying, well, you want this, therefore you dislike children or whatever, it's not productive to the debate. and i want to point out, i've been in congress for a long time, i can tell you, gun control debates are very, very difficult. and
are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold stand
in the context globally. compare canada, germany, australia. where do we stand when it comes to gun deaths in america? >> our gun homicide rates is greater by orders of magnitude compared to all other comparable societies. which is to say, industrialized democracies. our overall violent crime rate -- this is a distinction worth making -- is not as distinct. in other words, you're not necessarily in greater peril of having your car stolen or having some he eu over the head with a baseball bat in the u.s. in fact, nyc is safer than many other big cities around the world in terms of violent crime overall. but we have a gun homicide problem. our crime is more lethal because we have more guns. >> talking about something like 9000 homicide gun deaths in the united states every year. i think that it has let 150. germany, 170. and then you would include suicide and what is it in the u.s.? >> we have roughly something in order of 30,000 gun deaths a year, but the large majority are suicide. >> we're talking to paul barrett. when we come back, we will host a debate on the issue of gun violence in am
states a couple years ago. germany had 158. canada 173. the united states has 15 times more than anybody else on a populpo population basis. there is one reason and one reason only, insane attitude towards guns. the nra should stop, they won't. we should stop them from being enablers of mass murder. >> being the national rifle association. congressman, thanks very much for your perspective. >> thank you. >> jerriey edjerry. >>> former chief economist at the u.s. sentencing commission and author of the third edition of the book "more guns, less crimes." thank you very much for coming in. i'll give you a chance to respond. the united states has a lot more murders, you just heard from congressman nadler. he said it's because there are so many guns that are so easiil available out there. >> well, you look at the murder rates in the other countries whether if be germany he just mentioned or others and they had lower murder rates relative to the united states before they had the gun control laws. when britain, other countries, ireland, jamaica, other places imposed gun bans, murder rates went
would be held to account. >> meanwhile, germany plans to send 400 soldiers as well as patriot missiles to turkey, syria's border. >>> d.c. police are trying to figure out what led to a stabbing in front of the australian embassy. this happened just after 10:00 last night on rhode island avenue just near scotts circle in northwest. police tell us a man was stabbed in the side. he was conscious and breathing when rescuers took him to the hospital. there's no word this morning on that man's condition or of any arrest. >>> new this morning, d.c. firefighters are trying to figure out what sparked the flames at this apartment building in southeast washington. the fire started around 1:30 along minnesota avenue. no one was hurt. we're told at least three families had to find another place to sleep. also new this morning, at least one person is in the hospital after a condo fire in alexandria. the flames broke out after midnight inside the building along south washington street. we're told at least one person was taken to the hospital with burns and smoke inhalation. the cause of that fire is
of germany from '85 to '89 and before that worked as a state department as assistant secretary of state for european and can nad yain affairs. and before that was the drecker of political military affairs in the department of state. so he along with his colleagues has a long and imminent involvement in the issues. and finally, left side but not least, ambassador mat lock known to many of us retired foreign service officer. he's been holding a series of academic posts. i'm not going to list them all since '91. during the 35 years in the foreign service he served as ambassador to the soviet union from 1978 to 1991 as special assistant to the president for national security affairs, and senior directer for european and sowf yet affairs on the national security staff from '83 to '86. as ambassador of czech from '81 to '83. i won't go over the imminent and long career in the interest of time. i wanted to give you a brief recap for all three of them. of course, marvin, who is the edward r murrow professor at harvard kennedy school of government, and contributing news analysts for npr and fox
class. people did this. we decided that if you look at other countries like germany, their middle class is in better shape doing better trading against the world. their companies are making money, and things heard that were not impossible, not possible in america, are actually happening in germany, and their wages went up five times faster than ours. there's something wrong inside the american political and economic system 689 that's what the book is about. >> who stole the american dream, thank you for being on
officials say once the parliaments in germany and the netherlands -- which is expected -- it'll be only a matter of weeks until missile systems are installed along turkey's border with syria so as to guard against possible reprisals for the country's staunch support of the syrian rebels. >> we know that syria possesses missiles, we know they have the chemical weapons, and, of course, that also have to be included in our calculations. and this is also the reason why it is a matter of urgency to insure effective defense and protection of our ally, turkey. >> reporter: now, secretary of state clinton, this has just crossed the wires, is in brussels, and she says, and i quote: we stand with turkey in the spirit of strong solidarity, and she adds, we stand ready to take the necessary steps for the defense of turkey. syria, we should point out, is believed to have hundreds if not thousands of tons of these chemical agents and also everything several hundred ballistic missiles to deliver them. megyn: james, thank you. a little more context on securing syria's chemical weapons. up to 75,000 tro
. she has stage four cancer. we have to go. get her to 250,000. before she goes to germany for more treatment. there is an election in louisiana.
me. the christmas tree originated in germany thousands of years after jeremiah. as they say on espn, come on, man! >> and thomas, pennsylvania. >> don't take it seriously, tom, i don't believe we are dealing with a ph.d. here. and by the way, miller has some thoughts about psi and his criticism of civiles of american military tomorrow. can't wait for that. and finally the tip of the day. i'm paying for washington d.c. and so are you. we are all paying for this city. our tax money makes it go. so we should take advantage of that. you should bring your kids here. even if they don't want to go, you make them go. washingston a great place to go, great buildings, history everywhere. i love the willard hotel where abraham lincoln stayed before he entered the white house. and georgetown. visit washington. factor tip of the day. and it's really nice at christmastime. and that is it for us tonight. please check out the fox news
california. >> you are kidding me, right, mike? you are kidding me. the christmas tree originated in germany thousands of years after jeremiah. as they say on espn, come on, man! >> and thomas, pennsylvania. >> don't take it seriously, tom, i don't believe we are dealing with a ph.d. here. and by the way, miller has some thoughts about psi and his criticism of civiles of american military tomorrow. can't wait for that. and finally the tip of the day. i'm paying for washington d.c. and so are you. we are all paying for this city. our tax money makes it go. so we should take advantage of that. you should bring your kids here. even if they don't want to go, you make them go. washingston a great place to go, great buildings, history everywhere. i love the willard hotel where abraham lincoln stayed before he entered the white house. and georgetown. visit washington. factor tip of the day. and it's really nice at christmastime. and that is it for us tonight. please check out the fox news
expectancy in the u.s., real estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> ringling brothers and barnum & bailey circus is celebrating a court victory today. back in 2000 several animal rights groups sued the circus claiming its elephants were abused. today one of the groups, the american society for the prevention of cruelty to animals, agreed to settle its part of the suit and pay the circus more than $9 million. the courts found out that animal rights activists had paid a former circus employee to bring the suit. >>> head to virginia where federal authorities revealed an enormous drug bust at dulles international airport. customs and border protection officers seized nearly 214 pounds of khat last week. khat is a dangerous stimula
is it that germany, a country that has 1/4 of the population of the united states, exports more than what the united states does? because if you look at our tax code, that's broken, it needs reform, industries in the united states that are employing americans are given two-year tax credits and we expect those american companies to make generational commitments on a two-year tax credit. you look at places like germany, they're providing 10-year tax credits that sends a signal, a signal of certainty, a signal of clarity to businesses in germany, that there is a commitment to embrace innovation and technology, to remain competitive in the manufacturing economy. manufacturing today is not labor-intensive. it's capital-intensive. you always have to be in a continuous improvement mode. but that requires one thing. it requires a confidence in the american people, a confidence in the american worker, in making the kind of commitments that are necessary to compete with china. i often hear people on this floor, every day, whining about china. yeah, china cheats on their currency. they treat their workers poor
at all? >> "24" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. it's beamed in illegally by -- you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stunningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that i like amer
. so we feel very good about france. ditto germany. >> isn't that incredible. >> rick, 52-week high when compared to avon. incredible. thank you so much for joining us. >> good to be here. >> good to see you. >> all right. stay tuned. sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than antelope with night-vision goggles. nice! get happy. get geico. >>> trip adviser and deutsche bank. >> deutsche bank likes this company. people love it. trip adviser is king. >> deutsche buying a hold on apache. >> apache has been such a dog. bad for apache. >> an a darko? >> ever since the daily, and other litigation, this is an inexpensive stock. i-like it. >> deutsche on omc. >> what's interesting, they're talking about negative momentum in ad
. spain was borrowing at 7%. >> germany went to the five-year high. we could have that, too. unlike them, our economy is not in tatters. they go five-year high on tatters. audi, good car. >> yes. good car. >> meantime, shares of costco this morning up in the premarket. warehouse retailer earned 95 cents a share in the first fiscal quarter. revenue, profit margins beating forecasts helped by rising sales. those higher membership fees did hike fees a year ago november, which doesn't happen very often. the journal today says, model looks great. the business is great. the stock is just -- people want to pay a lot of money for it, jim. >> oh, yeah, costco, those are remarkable numbers. i know you did an excellent special on coastco and it seems like the execution was impressive. people want to go there. >> as gas prices come down, that helps them, given they make it a bit of a loss leader. valuation rich for your blood. >> when you go to buy a house, you see kirkland more than any other brand. you can say, jim, that's not even -- i mean, what percent -- i am a real fan customer for kirkland.
partners such as germany, but understanding that things have to change. economist hardouvelis says greeks just need to believe that what's happening now really is leading toward a better future. >> once the depression stops and once the people start seeing the light at the end of the tunnel, then things will turn around. >> brown: is that your hope? or is it a forecast? >> i think in a year and a half we'll see stability. and the big question is whether the political system will be able to accommodate that period. >> brown: a year and a half more at best. small comfort for stelios karaglilanis and his family, facing the onset of winter-- it's too expensive to turn on the heat, he told us-- and a christmas unlike any he'd ever imagined. >> brown: there's more online from my reporting trip, including conversations with greek writers. find that on our poetry and art beat pages. >> warner: we return to our series of different voices and viewpoints on the nation's fiscal cliff debate. tea party activists took aim at government spending three years ago, with protests and rallies in washington a
come up to me and say why are we doing what so many have fled from? >> germany? germany has universal health care. >> yeah. what the hell is he talking about? >> stephanie: it's jim demint. >> it doesn't have to make sense. he's jim demint. >> ah. >> stephanie: he put a hold on the national women's history museum. we know all we need to know about chicks. he confuses the chicago teacher's strike with violence in the middle east. he said i was reading another story about a distance place where thugs had put 400,000 kids out on the streets, and then i realized it was a story about the chicago teacher's strike. and then he accuses president obama of taxing christmas. [ applause ] >> taxing christmas. >> stephanie: it's not even worth my energy to explain. >> how do you tax christmas? >> stephanie: you don't, and that's why -- you don't. you don't. [ sighs ] >> stephanie: like that added anything to the show. >> you want an angel on the top of the tree it is going to cost you. obama is going to charge you a million dollars. >> stephanie: all right. forty-six minutes afte
, when eastern germany and eastern europe. from her historical narrative on the iron curtain tonight at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. host: we are joined by matt kibbe, president and ceo of freedomworks. . seeing some speculation that speaker boehner may be willing to talk about taxes. what do you think speaker boehner needs to do? how much confidence do you have in representing the republican party perspective? guest: taxes will go up automatically. spending, the sequester, will happen unless republicans act. it is literally true that republicans do not have the ability to stop all the tax increases unless the president goes along with it. that said, taxes will only go up when it is a bipartisan solution. they need republicans to raise taxes. i think john boehner would make a huge mistake in raising taxes. we need to change the conversation and get rid of all the credit capitalism in the tax code. let's not do this in the discussion of punishing some people. host: what the think of the speaker's role in these negotiations? how does freedomworks feel about the agenda he's bringing to the table? h
close to an 8 1/2-month high. germany at a 52-week high. the euro at a 7 1/2-month high. things are still moving. china, big debate on the trough here. this is the debate the last two months here. goldman sachs upped its fourth quarter gdp estimates, 7.8% now instead of 7.6%. look, nobody's thinking china's going to go back to 10% or 12%. that's over. 8, 8 1/2, somewhere around there. there is good evidence now that q-4 might be the trough for china. this has been a big debate. a lot of people saying it's going to be weaker in 2013. real estate prices are improving. electricity consumption improving a little bit. industrial production, all of them looking better in the last couple of months. i think that's generally a positive. the one big thing i want to point out, if you watch what's going on in japan, we've got a new prime minister who's coming in who's putting intense pressure on the bank of japan, essentially trying to break their independence essentially. he's told them they've got to increase their inflation target from 1% to at least 2%, and told they have to start massi
the kind of transition you had in germany? today germany is to lay prosperous country. will south korea consider the north koreans to be their cousins and brothers? there is a huge disparity at this point. you can see the physical difference because of the questions of nutrition and the way they are raised. is a total state based on fear. the challenge is to figure out how to absorb water looking like two or three lost generations. host: foreign policy in review with eli lake. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independen ts. you can send us the tweet or e- mail, f twitter.com/cspanwj, journal@c-span.org. john kerry for secretary of state and chuck cale for secretary of defense -- chuck hayes cogel. how will these nominations go/ guest: chuck hagel has not been nominated yet. john kerry was announced by the white house on friday. the fact that kerry was announced does not bode well for the trial balloon of chalk .eguck hagel we have seen john mccain say they are going to vote for him. chuck hagel has been questioned by a nu
. >> eight people were killed when two small planes crashed in midair in in germany. police spokesperson said weather conditions were ideal at the time of the collision. to brazil where an inmate found himself stuck in a difficult situation. two prisoners were trying to escape the jail. the first inmate made it out but the second got stuck in a hole in the wall. prisoner guards snapped these pictures of him and local media report that a shower pipe was used to create the hole. firefighters had to rescue the prisoner using a hammer and drill. >> looked like he was really sweating that. coming up, flooded cars, damaged homes. parts of maryland were devastated by superstorm sandy. >> and blizzard like conditions in parts of europe. >> also blizzard-like conditions in the northern part of our country but here, steamy out there. areas of fog. details coming up on the forecast. look grandma, they have a hobbit menu. i know. apparently, they based an entire movie off of it. try the all-new hobbit inspired menu, only at denny's. and see "the hobbit: an unexpected journey." >> blizzards and high winds
the army. within months he was on the front lines of the battle of the bulge, germany's last major offensive and one of the bloodiest battles of world war ii. demler was captured and sent to a nazi prison camp. >> it was the coldest winter in history and snow up over your hips. you know what they say, why didn't you escape? where are you going to go? there's no place to go. >> reporter: this was you on the day you were liberated. a photographer from "life" magazine was on hand when americans liberated demler's p.o.w. camp. they called him the human skeleton. >> the biggest thing is what it meant to these veterans. >> reporter: joe and julian are part of "operation resolve," a wisconsin-based program that brings world war ii veterans to see their memorial on the mall in washington, d.c. joe dean is the founder. >> we have a great sense of urgency. one world war ii veteran dies every 90 seconds in this country. across wisconsin we've flown almost 5,000 veterans out here to see their memorial. >> reporter: the organization is the subject of a new documentary called "honor flight." so
laws. guest: i do not think that will solve the problem. germany has the strongest gun- control laws in the world paying big in chin. in china, individuals cannot own any arms. we have the same kinds of violent situations going on. in connecticut they had some of the strongest gun-control laws in the country and it still occurred there. let's look at the problems that caused this to occur. let's focus on solving those problems instead of just saying it is guns. right now today in connecticut, also weapons -- an assault weapon is a machine gun. they are already controlled. someone cannot just go to the store and buy an assault weapon today. it is not about clips or number of rounds in a gun. we have to focus upon those problems that caused this young man to snap, to kill his mom. i cannot imagine that. and then go and kill six-year oldss. the guns did not make him do that. the guns were not evil. he is evil, his act is evil. we need to deal with what caused the problems. i don't think the guns caused it. host: back to your home state of georgia, james is on the phone on the independen
them. laws in the u.s. don't apply to a hacking group in germany, for example. >> talk about the bigger issue. cyber security in general, because as you know leon panetta said earlier this year the next pearl harbor might be through cyber warfare. >> yeah. >> is this something that at this point people recognize? is the problem getting worse or better? >> the potential for a major strike, this pearl harbor idea he's put out there, that is not hyperbole. this could be the most efficient ay for those who want to strike our government and society or any other because it doesn't require the physical manifestations of previous terrorism where you have to go disrupt infrastructure take over aircraft do physical destruction. you can stay in your own country, reach out for almost no cost, and deploy software that can bring down utilities, hospitals. worst of all, it could squirrel financial markets. i don't think anything is a higher risk than the ability of going after financial markets and subtly causing problems not turning out the lights on the nyse but jus
lott is in the air force, he's been stationed in germany the last three years. he said there were no words what it was like to see his family again. i would agree. >> that's a huge moment for a family. >> welcome back to "cbs this morning," everyone. >>> let's say you got a smartphone for christmas, well you're probably learning how to use it today, but how much is it learning about you? sharyl attkisson has an eye-opening look how your smartphone is watching almost everything you do. >> reporter: with more than a billion smartphone users, revenue from applications could soon reach $100 billion, a lot of them like flickar and instagram can turn your phone into a studio. but some have little ideas what may be sent along with the photos. do you have any idea what your smartphone collects and does in applications? >> not really not really. >> reporter: we're going to take a photograph of you and see if our expert can find it based on just the photograph. our expert is jason hong a mobile privacy specialist at carnegie melon institute. he's waiting at our washin
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. ftse actually just about break even at this point. germany, the dax up by about 0.3%. in asia, you saw the hang seng was up just barely. korea was up just barely. the shanghai composite was up by close to 0.8%. and nikkei down by about a quarter percentage point. oil prices this morning pulling back a little bit. down another 33 cents to $88.76. yesterday we did see oil cross above $90 for the first time since october 22nd. ended up down at about $89. but crossing early in the morning above $90. the ten year note at this point yielding 1.639%. i feel like we look at the same board board every morning. euro still up above 1.30. the dollar-yen at 81.99. and gold prices this morning slightly lower. down by about $15. $1704.40 an ounce. kevin ferry at the cme, kevin, we are watching the fiscal cliff every single day kind of watching negotiations as they play out. maybe that's not the wisest thing to do with the markets. what are the things that are popping up and have you thinking about stocks as we approach the end of the year? >> yeah, ats least it gives some type of day trade headline t
one. >> angela merkel number two. easy to understand. >> europe goes through germany and germany goes through merkel. >> let's talk about vladimir putin coming in at number three. >> yes. he has been on the list even when he wasn't president because we all know who was still running the show then. he's back up there with a bullet. he's been as high as two on this list. here is somebody who has a u.n. security council permanency, controls a huge oil and gas reserve, has a nuclear tipped army and wields his power very effectively. >> and loves to show his muscles. many times as possible. >> powerful in many ways. that's right. >> of late bill gates has been the rodney dangerfield of silicon valley or seattle. he gets absolutely no respect but you give him plenty. he comes in at number four. why? >> this is where you talk about the spheres of power. here's somebody who is trying to cure world disease. in favourable terms of affecting millions of lives. he is 57 years old. he's the second richest man in the world. he has the most influential nonprofit in the world. and if you just look at
voted for rug declaring war on japan and germany. back to present-day politics, we now know that the u.s. supreme court plans to dive into one of the most talked about and emotional issues of our age. whether same-sex couples have the right to marry. the high court is taking on two cases, one involving the federal defense of marriage act, or d doma, and another involving california's proposition 8, banning same-sex marriages in that state. for analysis into these historic cases, what's going to be a historic hearing, i want to bring in kinji yoshityoshito, professor of constitutional law at new york city. great to see you. >> good to see you. >> put prop 8 aside for a second. do you believe that the supreme court will strike down doma. this is what what you've said. walk me through your thinking on that one. >> y bet. so doma is a really narrow challenge insofar as what the statute does is it says for federal purposes marriages are defined between one man and one woman. so i think it might be best to clarify this by example. so you take edie windsor, a plaintiff coming out of new york
by about 2029 -- to outgrow skwroeupl -- to outgrow germany by 2029. none of us is going to suggest that every issue with respect to russia has been resolved. we know there are still points of tension, and some of them in the foreign policy area are very relevant today. for instance, over syria. we understand that. we hope that at recent events, syria may be moving russia and the united states closer in terms of our thinking. but it is only a good thing to bring russia into a rules-based system with mechanisms for peaceful, transparent dispute resolution. there is no debate. and i think the chair knows this full well, that the very tragic and senseless death of anticorruption lawyer sergei magnitsky who died while in russian custody, that those events are simply unacceptable. they're appalling. and it highlights a human rights problem that has grown in its scope, not diminished. it's one we hope to be able to resolve with good relationships and good discussions. senator cardin, a sponsor of that legislation, in the house of the senate is going to speak shortly about it, and i will l
, germany throughout and other countries as well. they are anxious as you know, they are anxious as to how this will work. we have said let's give it more time, let's work through the substitution of compliance issues, but they have been excellent. >> thank you. my time is expired. i yield back. thank you mr. chairman. >> thank you, mr. chairman and chairman gensler and director cook for being here. right that there is a different timetable that has been adopted by the sec and the cftc and compare of all requirements? >> you are right that we were given an easier task because we are just a future in the swaps regulator and they have such a broad portfolio. as we have completed about 80% of the rules. we have one year to complete the task but here we are two and a half years later. >> is that going to be confusing for the firms and costly for? >> there may be challenges. the swaps that we overseas, interest-rate swaps and physical commodities swaps and credit industries represent about 95% of the marketplace used across this country the securities based swaps are not only a smaller part of
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.s. soldier who was stationed in germany. he had a little girl with a scottish citizen. while he was deployed to afghanistan, the mother brought the little girl up to scotland where she's from, as a lot of military families do. after his deployment was finished, he then moved to alabama, was stationed a the a base there and that's when the marriage fell apart. >> steve: expecting her to come live with him? >> the mother did come live with him as did the daughter, but the marriage fell apart. so the mom grabbed the little girl and headed back to scotland. that's when the u.s. courts really got involved. there was a lower u.s. court that ruled -- i think is what will surprise some folks -- that there is a treaty that the u.s. and the u.k. are a party to, along with a lot of other parties, call the international child abduction treaty. and that treaty is what was upheld by the lower courts in the united states. so the mother was able to keep custody of the little girl. now the u.s. supreme court is hearing the case today and we'll see what happens. the effects of this, the impact of this will li
the way other countries do. so we're essentially subsidizing like france and germany, for example because their governments have worked out a way to negotiate prices. so medicare, for example gets to set rates on payments to doctors and hospitals but doesn't have any power to negotiate rates on medical devices, drugs or durable medical equipment. so we don't have a market place wherein we have any leverage. ultimately, we pay more than other countries do for those things because we don't have any say. >> stephanie: also, you were talking about cost basically being arbitrary. you can pay $4,000 at one hospital. $15,000 at another. >> it should be infuriating. people should be angry about this. we have no idea what things really cost in this country. medically. so if you go to get a procedure or you have an emergency for god forbid and you end up in an emergency room, you're not price checking. you're going -- you're going to get fixed or healed. >> stephanie: i have a gushing head injury. maybe i should go shop
woman angela merkel of germany. russian's vladimir putin number three then it is some nonpoliticians, pope benedict and ben bernanke are in the top ten. michael bloomberg and the ceo of walmart are in the top 20. >> bill: did we get an answer on our tweets? >> i'll have o to see. he didn't answer our tweet. i don't know if he's tweeted anything yet. i'll look him up. >> the grammy nominations were announced last night. album of the year nominees include el camino by the black keys, some nights by fun mumford and sons, channel orange by frank ocean and blunder bust by jack white. song of the year nominees include carly rae jepsen, kelly clarkson miguel and fun. grammys coming out in february. >> i'm glad i'm not a judge of the grammys. if i had to choose between -- >> the list that you just gave -- song of the year -- they won't be around in a couple of years. they just won't. >> kelly clarkson will be around. >> kelly clarkson, you're right. >> she's been around for ten years. she's been very succe
, but this contribution of three total member nations, germany expected to begin ratifying its deployment of two patriot batteries, the netherlands as well. let me give you the back story. the past two months we have seen exchanges, syrian army accused of firing into turkey. turkey returning fire. that sense of host tillity and volatility on the border leading them to ask nato for help and patriots coming here at this point. expected to be used mostly in the event of missiles being fired and have the ability to take down aircraft as well. we heard from u.s. secretary of defense leon panetta, that the u.s. does have a plan in the event that they see the assad regime use or prepare to use chemical weapons. not clear if patriots will be involved in that. but right now, in the very volatile part of the world, we have u.s. troops potentially on the ground. >> nick paton walsh, thank you for the update. >>> frank discussions, open lines of communication, but no deal. 18 days until the fiscal cliff. president obama and john boehner met just under an hour. after coordinated press releases, both sides assured th
with a pulitzer prize winner on life in soviet east germany, poland, and hungary. from her historical narrative, send a night at 8:00 on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the rest of the program, we are going to be talking more about the shooting yesterday in newtown, connecticut at the sandy hook elementary school. 27 victims including 20 children. we have broken down the phone numbers in terms of regions of the country. we have a special line for educators and administrators. if you work in education, give us a call and give us some of your thoughts as to what happened yesterday at the sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. we've got hte map up there which whos connecticut, hartford the capital. newtown in the southwest corner near the new york border. we will keep putting the numbers up on your screen. we want to show you the front page of the local newspaper. 20 children, six adults fatally shot. adam lanza was identified as the gunman. president obama addresses a grief-stricken nation. "our hearts are broken." showing a picture that has been on a lot of di
away the guns from the people in germany. you saw the results. host: what about other kinds of gun laws? you talked about farming and officer -- arming an officer, some type of official presence in schools, but what about a bill to ban assault weapons? caller: it used to be and i'm getting mixed -- are they going to bring up banning semi- automatic rifles? there were not been used in the crime, from what i understand. host: good morning to lois, a republican. caller: it is the people we have to worry about. it is mental illness. families recognize their children as they are growing up. if that could be curtailed, i know they would hate to put them in a mental institution. i would, too, because they love their child just the same. but those children that grow up with mental illness, it does not matter how they get it, they are going to get weapons of some sort. it is not the guns that the problem, it's the people. they have to collect those mentally ill people. host: would you lock them all up? caller: no. you hear about doctors. i don't know quite, but that is what the problem is, menta
since world war ii? i mean, i don't think germany's going to invade france any time soon or russia's going to invade poland. but yet we have a huge amount of deployed american forces in europe. i mean, maybe we need to have a discussion about whether or not we need that. whether or not we can afford that expense. whether or not that does anything to enhance our security. again, i want a military that is the best in the world, i want it to continue to be that way, i want it to be second to none. i want to make sure we have all that we need but i don't want to be investing in things we don't need. and when the joint chiefs of staff and when the secretary of defense and all the experts tell us that they don't need something and we here appropriate money to keep something going that is unnecessary, that is unwanted, at the same time while you're trying to cut the benefits of some poor old lady, her social security, there's something wrong with this equation. we got to start thinking about the security of people here in this country as well. and what we're going to do right after this i
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